• Date With The Mummies 8.9: More Temple-Hopping

    by  • 6 March, 2013 • Art & Architecture, Travel • 0 Comments

    By this time, I had all information in my head mixed up and I’m already getting tired of seeing almost the same thing again and again. Don’t get me wrong, this doesn’t mean I’m not interested at all, I just felt the need to see something else. On our 8th day, my silly wish to escape from exploring temples didn’t end, in fact I was bombarded with three!

    With practically nothing to do in the morning (yes, we have another free time), we decided to tour Edfu by ourselves. Of course we’re to see yet another temple dedicated to an Egyptian god but marveling on a wonder all by our dear selves, without a tour guide telling us to “look here”, “check this out, “this is blah blah” and “that is blah blah” made it feel different. Maybe I got fed up with our tour guide’s monotonous and uber loooong lectures. :p Anyway, at 8-ish we went out of the ship and hired a carriage that will take us to the temple and back.

    Edfu, Egypt

    Built in honor of the falcon-headed god Horus (I think Haroeris and Horus are the same), the aptly named Temple of Horus is the second largest in Egypt and the best preserved one. It was said that there was once an aviary here where they get their sacrifices during the god’s festival. Built during the Ptolemaic times, it was no surprise to see Greek influences in its architecture. We were welcomed by a pylon whose relief illustrates battle scenes of King Ptolemy fighting before Horus. (But seriously, he looks like dancing)

    Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt

    Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt

    Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt

    Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt

    In the sanctuary is this boat-like statue that features the god Horus.

    Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt

    The carriage waited for us on the parking area and brought us back to our cruise ship. We then sailed again come lunch time and saw more life-in-the-Nile-River sceneries.

    Nile River, Egypt

    Nile River, Egypt

    These kids were waving and yelling at everyone in the ship. I guess they get happy and excited every time they see a ship sailing along the river, although I’m sure that it’s a pretty common scene to them.

    Nile River, Egypt

    After a few hours on the water, we finally docked at the Luxor port. We headed to Karnak Temple Complex, the largest among the temple complexes in Egypt, comprised with temples, sanctuaries, chapels, obelisks, monuments, courts, palace, even a lake! Now, I can’t really put into words the ins and outs of Karnak Temple because it’s really huge!

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    The papyrus columns were imposing on their 82 feet height. I can easily visualize how grand it was during its time.

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    Presenting the ever famous (twin) obelisk of Queen Hatshepsut. At the moment, only one was left standing, as the other lying somewhere near the Sacred Lake.

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    Like the other temples we’ve visited, this was also used by Christians. This ruin looked pretty much like a crucifixion, don’t you think?

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    This avenue of ram-headed sphinxes gave me the chills! And it runs along the city!!

    Karnak Temple, Egypt

    See! Until our last stop, Luxor Temple! Woah, mind blown!

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    Though it has been said that it’s best to visit when the floodlights are up, I wish we came earlier when it’s getting natural light. The temple complex is a mishmash of everything–a pagan temple, a (once) chapel and a mosque.

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    They kinda look scary because of the uplights. Hah!

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    These gigantic columns made us all look like elves. Well actually, everything in this temple is very big.

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    This huge pylon graced by another towering obelisk and two giant Ramses II stands on the southern part of the temple. Its twin obelisk can now be seen in France. Remember the clock tower standing oddly in the courtyard of Alabaster Mosque? It was given to Egypt in exchange of that obelisk.

    Luxor Temple, Luxor, Egypt

    We capped the night off with a carriage ride along the streets of Luxor, passing by its dim-lit residential community and lively market. Our last night in Egypt was the best time to spend the extra pounds we have.

    About

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *